December 8th, 2001

eye

(no subject)

Latest News

Whilst a few of the tracks are completed and have been through Tchad Blake's final mixing process, Peter continues lyric writing for the remaining tracks.

Contributions so far have come from artists as diverse as Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and the brilliant Blind Boys of Alabama on vocals, as well as Peter Green (formally of Fleetwood Mac) on Guitar and Danny Thompson on Double Bass (Talk Talk, David Sylvian, Tim Buckley and Nick Drake to name a few). The Blind Boys of Alabama, recently signed to Real World Records, were so much in demand that Peter emailed them the track for their backing vocals whilst they were performing at WOMAD Singapore.

UP will be released sometime in 2002.

lifted from here
eye

(no subject)

THE LAND OF PLENTY
Leonard Cohen


Don’t really know who sent me
To raise my voice and say:
May the lights in The Land of Plenty
Shine on the truth some day.

I don’t know why I come here,
Knowing as I do,
What you really think of me,
What I really think of you.

For the millions in a prison,
That wealth has set apart –
For the Christ who has not risen,
From the caverns of the heart –

For the innermost decision,
That we cannot but obey -
For what’s left of our religion,
I lift my voice and pray:
May the lights in The Land of Plenty
Shine on the truth some day.

I know I said I’d meet you,
I’d meet you at the store,
But I can’t buy it, baby.
I can’t buy it anymore.

And I don’t really know who sent me,
To raise my voice and say:
May the lights in The Land of Plenty
Shine on the truth some day.

I don’t know why I come here,
knowing as I do,
what you really think of me,
what I really think of you.

For the innermost decision
That we cannot but obey
For what’s left of our religion
I lift my voice and pray:
May the lights in The Land of Plenty
Shine on the truth some day.
eye

(no subject)

i read a lot of science fiction. science fiction is an interesting genre, in that it encompasses many other genres. a science fiction story can be a mystery, it can be a western, it can be an historical novel (well, an alternative historical novel), it can be a love story, horror, adventure... often sci-fi is used satirically or allegorically to comment on the world around us. i'm currently reading a book called "jumping off the planet", by david gerrold. i bookmarked a couple of interesting bits to post for you.

The fat man was explaining to the woman that money was a liquid, and that the health of the economy could be measured by how fast the liquid flowed through all the different parts. He said that if you gave a hundred plastic dollars to a rich man and a hundred plastic dollars to a poor man, the rich man's plastic dollars would be like drops in a reservoir, and they would move a lot slower than the poor man's dollars. The poor man's money would be like drops in a river. They would flow a lot faster and farther than the rich man's money.

The dark-haired woman said that the rich man's money worked just as hard as the poor man's --- invesments created jobs. But the fat man argued that rich dollars just flowed from one financial reservoir to another, without ever going through the rest of the economy. The poor man's dollars are more liquid than the rich man's, so funding the flow-through ---paying people to consume---was good for the economy, because poor people bought things, and that created jobs for everybody.


then, further into the book, this one:

Jazz isn't music. Jazz is what happens when the music disappears and all that's left is the sound and the emotion connected to it. Jazz is a scream or a rant or a sigh. Or whatever else is inside, trying to get out.