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May. 25th, 2002 | 08:09 am

there is a parakeet on my bird feeder this morning

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Comments {10}

Acadiabaird

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from: acadiabaird
date: May. 25th, 2002 08:41 am (UTC)
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bwahahaha, oh no, thats funny!

somebodys parakeet got loose and turned wild!

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i

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from: i
date: May. 25th, 2002 09:10 am (UTC)
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i'll try to get a pic

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from: vyoma
date: May. 25th, 2002 02:46 pm (UTC)
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When I was a kid, we had that happen once. A bright yellow parakeet landed in our birdbath and my father went outside. It hopped right onto his outstretched hand and came into the house. It stayed with us for the next five years. We named her Woodstock and she was the sweetest little bird... used to hop up on the pillow and clean my face and stuff. Very cute.

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J

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from: banana
date: May. 25th, 2002 04:00 pm (UTC)
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At one place we saw when we were house hunting last year, there was a flock of them coming in to roost in the trees at the bottom of the garden. I believe they are not uncommon in England, because they survive and breed if they escape from people's houses.

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from: sherahi
date: May. 25th, 2002 06:55 pm (UTC)
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Please see if its interested in going to you/a cage, most birds like parakeets and cockatiels which get loose (because someone didn't clip their wings,) die fairly quickly from either exposure or being predated on. They usually try and hide in the sparrow flocks, but because they are so small, they get picked off or diseased or get sick fairly quickly. They are not made for this climate.

You may have a pet bird adoption facility nearby that he can then go to if you can't find a responsible family for him or don't wish to keep him. I can look into this if you're interested.

The amazons and mid sized birds do much better if they get out accidentally, but the little guy's are dead quickly and usually via someone's lunch.

Try and put some extra seed out for him and see if he hang's around. Also check the newspaper to see if their is a 'lost ad'. The owners (hopefully) miss him and are looking for him.

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i

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from: i
date: May. 25th, 2002 07:22 pm (UTC)
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he was really skittish. i couldn't even get as far as the door before he flew off. i'll try again if he comes back tomorrow.

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from: sherahi
date: May. 25th, 2002 08:23 pm (UTC)
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Oh well, he doesn't sound too tame. That is too bad. Stupid people *grumble grumble*

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(Deleted comment)

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from: sherahi
date: May. 25th, 2002 09:27 pm (UTC)
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Thanks for your comments. There are lots of great journals here, I'm just not one who feels comfortable journaling publicly at this time. But I's journal is great, he's a very talented artist. So enjoy!

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from: grady
date: May. 31st, 2002 09:40 am (UTC)
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Florida is one of the few places in the US where feral pets tend to flourish. I believe the Peterson Field Guide to birds of the US now lists Parakeets as a Florida bird now.

On another note i, wing is temporarily a community if you feel like posting something silly (or otherwise) in there. :)

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from: sherahi
date: May. 31st, 2002 01:41 pm (UTC)
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If you mean Quaker Parakeets, yes, they are thriving in Florida, and definitely listed in several bird guides (Actually a lot now list amazons and other pet birds since so many escape.)

Quaker parakeets are illegal to keep in California and several other states because they are concerned the same thing would happen. And its potential impact on agriculture and local species. Sometimes introduced pet birds can be disease vectors into established endemic populations. Not so much here, since if a small bird like that escapes, it tends to hang out with other introduced species like english sparrows.

Luckily, (unlike ferrets, which are also illegal to keep in California,) quakers aren't sold here or clubbed (breeders selling them through clubs, etc, like ferrets are.)

Many small pet birds which escape have been handraised, don't know how to survive in the wild, and many can't under harsher conditions. This leads to them slowly getting weaker and being picked off by predators. I have seen it all the time first hand. I've seen local Cooper's Hawks and Red Tails go after cockatiels, lovebirds, parakeets, english budgies and double yellow headed amazons, and succeed. Its very sad. Primarily because when you have a pet, you should be 100% responsible for its care at all times. Yes, accidents happen, but your responsibility as an owner is to take every precaution necessary to not let an accident happen. Because in the end, its the animal who ends up suffering because of it.

Many families buy parakeets and small birds and treat them like they would goldfish (Ie: as a throwaway pet.) So "accidental escapes" of them seem to happen a lot more with them than other more expensive species (where owners tend to know more about and be more serious about keeping those birds.) So I'm quite sensitive about it. I've had to rescue numbers of them (including three I have had as pets, one is still with me,) and I'm very glad when they are able to be in captivity again.

One of the last ones I brought home was a sick lovebird. We spent about 800$ total on him over 5 years. He had permanent liver and kidney damage from almost starving to death and picking up some parasites which only could have happened after he got loose. The damage was so serious that the vet was amazed he lived the five years with us, but he was a real cuddling friendly bird. Its too bad his life was cut short because some previous owner neglected their duties.

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